How Long is Your Driver’s License Suspended After a DWI Conviction in Texas?

By | February 18, 2019

The answer to this question depends on whether you have been convicted of DWI before and whether you have accepted probation or jail time as your sentence.

No Prior DWI Conviction

If you have not been convicted of DWI before and you have accepted probation as your sentence, and you have either already completed the DWI education course, or you complete the DWI education course within 180 days of being placed on probation, then as a practical matter your driver’s license is not going to be suspended.

If you have not been convicted of DWI before and you have chosen jail time as your sentence, then your car’s license will be suspended for anywhere from 90 days to one year. Most likely, you can obtain an occupational driver’s license for this period of time.

Prior DWI Conviction

If you have been convicted of DWI before and on this occasion you were prosecuted and convicted for either a class a misdemeanor DWI or a third-degree felony DWI, then the period of suspension is not less than 180 days nor more than two years.

If you’ve been convicted of DWI before and on this occasion you were convicted for either a class a misdemeanor or a third-degree felony DWI and the most recent offense was committed within five years of the date on which the most recent preceding DWI was committed, then the length of suspension is not less than one year nor more than two years.

Occupational Driver’s License Waiting Period

license suspension DWIAn important point keep in mind is how long the waiting period is. The “waiting period” means how long you have to wait before you’re able to get an occupational driver’s license.

If your driver’s license has been suspended as a result of one prior conviction during the five years preceding the date of your most recent DWI arrest, an order for an occupational driver’s license may not take effect until the 181st day after the effective date of the suspension.

If your driver’s license has been suspended does result of two or more prior convictions committed within five years of the date of the most recent DWI arrest, an order for an occupational driver’s license may not take effect until one year after the effective date of the suspension.

These waiting periods are sometimes called “hard suspensions.”